Contagion Plagues the Capital

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A mysterious illness struck the country, entering through the ports from abroad, and people died in huge numbers. It attacked the nation’s capital first. The federal government was completely unprepared for the mass… Continue reading

Secret Agents in Hoop Skirts

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This post originally appeared in September, 2017, and has been updated.  As March is Women’s History Month, it’s a perfect time to revisit the role so many women played in the Civil War.… Continue reading

A Woman of Her Own Making

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As March is Women’s History Month, I have chosen to continue my series on lesser known heroes with a woman far ahead of her time and a champion of women’s rights, Mary Wollstonecraft.… Continue reading

On Walls and the Great Salt Hedge

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Walls have suited the purposes of authoritarian governments throughout history whether they were built to keep people out (like Hadrian’s Wall) or to keep people in (like the Berlin Wall). Most of them… Continue reading

Katherine Johnson’s Remarkable Life

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As this year’s celebration of Black History Month comes to a close, it’s only fitting we at History Imagined commemorate the life of a true member of Black History. Katherine Johnson died this… Continue reading

Lift Every Voice and Sing

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By anyone’s standards, James Weldon Johnson led an extraordinary life: novelist, educator, attorney, diplomat, civil rights leader, and poet. His younger brother, John Rosamund Johnson was similarly accomplished: driving force in early 20th… Continue reading

Color Blind Historical Fiction

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When we began History Imagined, we decided it would lie at the intersection of history and fiction, and many of our posts have covered aspects of history that impact fiction. This one is… Continue reading

The Greensboro Sit-In & Black Wall Street

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This week marks the 60th anniversary of a significant event in the Civil Rights Movement—The Greensboro Sit-In. As a transplant to North Carolina, I am grateful that outright segregation is a thing of… Continue reading

The Japanese Schindler

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Given the history of Japanese atrocities in the 1930’s in Manchuria and during World War II in Korea, the Philippines, and other locations, it would be easy to see all Japanese of that… Continue reading

City on the Ice

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As the world warms, it is difficult to believe that winters between the 16th and early 19th centuries were so cold the city of London could move commerce and entertainment onto the Thames… Continue reading