Party with Your Boots On!!

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  I am going to break into my series on American crime to share a taste of true Texas heritage and tradition. As the saying goes, I was not born in Texas, but I got… Continue reading

The Natchez Trace

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Once young men routinely floated their goods—products of the farms and settlements of newly formed states and territories—down the Ohio, Wabash, and Illinois rivers to the Mississippi and on to New Orleans. They… Continue reading

Leesburg, VA’s Dog Money

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While in transit from my old home in Ohio to my new home in North Carolina, I had an occasion to visit Leesburg, VA, where I lived for eight years prior to moving… Continue reading

History of American Crime: the Colonial Period

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Today marks the start of a new series for me here on History Imagined. As some of you may be aware, my first published novel, Al Capone at the Blanche Hotel, features history… Continue reading

The Artist Who Dressed As She Pleased

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Rosa Bonheur dressed in trousers when women were still trussed in corsets. She required permission from the prefect of police to do so, but she was unapologetic about her choices. She lived her… Continue reading

The American Riverboat

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As early as 1811, steamboats began to navigate the inland rivers of the United States. Most notably, the Mississippi River, which ran from Minnesota to New Orleans, and the Missouri River, which intersected… Continue reading

America’s First State Chartered University

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In 1784, the former thirteen British colonies, now American states, were still reveling in the wonder of having defeated the most powerful military and naval force in the world less than a year… Continue reading

The Anatomist and the Body Snatchers

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The longer I look at the 1830s, the more I am fascinated by the collision of science, commerce, and social change. There are few colorful characters from that period that exemplify these more… Continue reading

Tar Heel Nation

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In honor of my new home, North Carolina, I decided to dig into why the state is known as the “Tar Heel” state. I had heard a story years ago, something about slaves… Continue reading

The World’s First Women’s College

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As an author of historical fiction, it is a good thing I enjoy research, which sometimes takes almost as much time as the actual writing of the novel. I am presently in full… Continue reading