Angel On The Battlefield

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As I was researching The Forgotten Debutante, my last book in the Cotillion Ball Series, I learned of the National Reburial Initiative, which took place after the Civil War finished. Most Americans are… Continue reading

Travels through Historical Fiction: the Romance of Cornwall

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It has, therefore, been a favorite boast of the people of Wales and Cornwall, that the original British stock flourishes in its unmixed purity only among them. — Thomas Bulfinch, American writer The… Continue reading

Timber Trade Along the Ottawa

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In the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries the fur trade played a large part in the economic development of North America. Popular imagination about the era is riddled with images related to that trade:… Continue reading

Godey’s Lady’s Book

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A few weeks ago, while doing research on when Thanksgiving was made a national holiday, I was surprised to find out the woman who spearheaded the campaign for a national day of celebration,… Continue reading

Happy New Year, Y’All!

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In the American South, it is tradition on New Year’s Day to partake of a very simple meal promised to bring good luck and fortune in the new year. Failure to eat the… Continue reading

From Our Team to Yours!

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  From the History Imagined team, wishing you and yours a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year! Regular posts will begin again after New Year’s Day. Until then, we hope that… Continue reading

Triumph, Plunder, and the Full Weight of History

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Lovers of history know that objects shed light on the lives of people in past times. Some bring profound insight into a particular era, movement, or event. Only a few carry the weight… Continue reading

Travels through Historical Fiction: From Sarum to Salisbury

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Salisbury, England 1992 – We walked up the narrow street toward the old city wall where heavy wooden doors with iron bindings and large ring handles stood open, inviting both pedestrian and vehicular… Continue reading

The National Road & The True Gateway to the West

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A few weeks ago, I wrote about Steubenville, OH and how it was, according to present day Steubenville residents, the real gateway to the west, long before St. Louis adopted the title. I… Continue reading

Thanksgiving Traditions

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Due to America’s great cultural and religious diversity, more Americans now celebrate Thanksgiving than they do Christmas. Most of us spent yesterday with family, cooking and eating a feast, usually involving a turkey,… Continue reading