Category Archive: historical fiction

From Party Drug to Medical Miracle

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  Persons of a certain age who had surgery as children may remember the anesthesiologist placing a gauze covered wire cage over their noses and mouths. With the cage firmly in place, the… Continue reading

The Swamp Fox: Hero of the Revolution

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One of my writing passions is taking those tantalizing footnotes of history and weaving stories around them. Celebrating Independence Day got me thinking about heroes and reminded me that there are some who… Continue reading

The Yellow Slave Trade

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Recently, a human trafficking operation was exposed in Florida, in which young Chinese girls were imported under the guise of finding legitimate employment and then made to perform sexual acts from the cover… Continue reading

Thanksgiving Without the Pilgrims

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November moves along and it is time for tall black hats, turkey, and indigenous peoples in highly incorrect head dresses. In the United States we all know the drill: the Pilgrim Fathers of… Continue reading

America’s First Balloon Flight

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This week would not be complete without paying homage to the first American to attempt air flight by flying in a balloon. On September 8, 1830 Charles Durant did exactly that. He flew… Continue reading

Glitz, Glamour, and Gambling: an American in Havana

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He stood only five feet, five inches in height with a slight frame. From his appearance, one might have assumed he was a baker, deli owner, or banker. He was smart enough to… Continue reading

The Cleghorns, Gardens, and a Princess

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Writers often wander down some winding roads; many call it “the research rabbit hole.” This past week I got lost in one when I began by asking about public gardens that may have… Continue reading

The National Trails System in America

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While doing the research for my last entry here on the Appalachian Trail, I discovered there are two others, which form the “Triple Crown” of hiking. They are the Pacific Crest Trail, which… Continue reading

History of American Crime: Murder and the Public in the 19th Century

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From the truly heinous to the seriously ridiculous, antisocial human activity has been codified in the New World since colonial times. And as human nature has not changed all that much since Cain… Continue reading

How London’s Bobbies Got Their Name

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There are few things more synonymous with London than the Tower, Big Ben, double decker busses, black cabs, and the traditional headgear of the Metropolitan Police. The custodian helmet, as it is officially… Continue reading