Author Archive

Biting Wit in the Gilded Age

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I have always suffered serious art envy. I would love to be able to put ideas on paper or canvas, but alas I do not have the artistic talent. It is especially frustrating… Continue reading

A Woman Scorned: a Gilded Age #MeToo Tale

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In an era riddled with scandals both personal and public, the one involving a US Congressman stands out for the sheer boldness of one of its participants. Long before the present #MeToo movement,… Continue reading

Murder in the Time of Robber Barons: the Goddess, the Architect, and the Millionaire, Part II

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In my last post, we left Evelyn Nesbit at the peak of her career as a model, showgirl, and sex symbol of the new century. Though her virtue had been stolen through trickery… Continue reading

Murder in the Time of Robber Barons: the Goddess, the Architect, and the Millionaire, Part I

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No review of Gilded Age crime would be complete without a look at the Crime of the Century as it was called. The 2oth Century  was only 11 1/2 months old when a… Continue reading

Murder in the Time of Robber Barons, Part I: The Scattered Dutchman and the Birth of Yellow Journalism

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For the next few posts, we will peek behind the Gilded Age curtain of exquisite manners, astounding wealth, and prescribed behavior and take a look at some of the folks who broke the… Continue reading

Living the Gilded Life: Wealth and Corruption

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Have you ever dreamed of acquiring staggering wealth, wealth so great that it couldn’t be spent in several lifetimes no matter how extravagant one might be? America has certainly produced its share of… Continue reading

Living the Gilded Life: Snowbirds’ Retreat

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Unless one has been completely out of touch for the last few years, one is surely aware of the PBS phenom, Downton Abbey, written by master storyteller Julian Fellowes. The story line begins… Continue reading

Ragtime Man

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As a life-long amateur musician interested in musicology, I was surprised to see the subject of today’s post listed in the New York Times as being overlooked by history. It is hard to understand… Continue reading

The Man Who Invented Hand Washing

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Before Louis Pasteur, there was Ignaz Semmelweis (1818-1865), a Hungarian obstetrician who developed a theory that saved lives, but was ridiculed and ultimately rejected for his efforts. Born July 1, 1818 in Buda,… Continue reading

War and Pestilence: a Doctor’s Story

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In this time of medical crisis, I believe most of us have a renewed respect for our medical personnel. From the highly skilled healers to the hospital night custodians, they are laboring under… Continue reading