Author Archive

Sir James Clark: Death, Treatment, and a Society Doctor

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In researching Rome in 1820 for my most recent book, the first Englishman to leap off the page was of course John Keats. The poet lived in an apartment by the Spanish Steps… Continue reading

Waterloo Fact and Fiction

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Two hundred years ago Wednesday (March 25, 1815), Britain, Austria, Prussia and Russia signed a formal defense treaty against Napoleonic France called the Seventh Coalition. They all agreed to hurry troops into Belgium.… Continue reading

Shame, Denial, and Abolition in England

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“You may choose to look the other way but you can never say again that you did not know.”                             … Continue reading

The Sad Fate of Wellington’s Brother-in-Law

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Two weeks ago Linda Pennell entertained us with a description of the Battle of New Orleans, the battle and the song, on the 200th anniversary of the event. The comments it drew included… Continue reading

Nelson, Perry, and the Battle of Lake Erie

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I write stories set in late Georgian England and the Regency period, among other things. Heroes in such stories inevitably have some connection to the Napoleonic wars, either the army or the navy.… Continue reading

O Wonderful!

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Oh wonderful! Christmas is coming and the waiting is the best part. At least, I always thought so. These days, folks know Halloween is on the way when the Christmas displays go up… Continue reading

What Did Your Hero Do for a Living?

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Recently a writer colleague sent out a plea for help. She wanted to know what occupation, that existed at a particular time in a particular place, she might authentically assign to a character.… Continue reading

Micro-History and Storytelling

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Jane Austen famously said, “Real solemn history, I cannot be interested in…. The quarrels of popes and kings, with wars and pestilences in every page; the men all so good for nothing, and… Continue reading