Author Archive

The Bridge Builder

by

Victorian England, as I pointed out in my earlier post, The Pastry Chef, produced a bumper crop of genuine characters: rogues, villains, explorers, heroes, geniuses, entrepreneurs, and colorful eccentrics. This week I highlight a… Continue reading

After the Bonnie Prince—the Jacobite Succession

by

…lonely cairns are o’er the men,  Who fought and died for Charlie!                         Sound the Pibroch, traditional ballad If the men who fell at Culloden lie under lonely cairns, where is Bonnie Prince… Continue reading

The Pastry Chef

by

As England slipped from the Georgian era into the Victorian and the sun no longer set on the British Empire, the country produced a bumper crop of interesting people: rogues, villains, explorers, heroes,… Continue reading

Where the Roads of Imagination Lead

by

If fiction fuels the mind, historical fiction poured jet fuel into mine from early on. It created a lifelong fascination with history and pushed me to question everything I read. Why question? At… Continue reading

Christmas Pusan, 1950

by

On December 25, 1950, General Edward Almond arrived in Pusan, South Korea along with the very last of the refugees from Hungnam in the north following a horrific military disaster. Chinese forces pushed… Continue reading

Thanksgiving Without the Pilgrims

by

November moves along and it is time for tall black hats, turkey, and indigenous peoples in highly incorrect head dresses. In the United States we all know the drill: the Pilgrim Fathers of… Continue reading

They Also Serve

by

A novel is generally considered “historical” when it is set fifty years or more in the past. By that standard any story set before 1966, when the first of the baby boomers left… Continue reading

The Worst of Times—The Bristol Riots

by

Unrest in the streets, peaceful demonstrations for change overshadowed by rioting and violence, demands increase in law and order—Baton Rouge? Ferguson? No, Bristol 1831 at the height of the Reform Crisis. Longing for… Continue reading

Ancient Scourge/Modern Crises

by

Before the Zika crisis and before Ebola, West Nile Virus, or even Yellow Fever, mosquitoes brought Malaria. We just didn’t know it. Malaria is an old scourge. Chinese writings as old as 2700… Continue reading

Diversity in Upper Canada

by

My grandmother is Ojibwa, my father was French, and my husband was a Scot. You can despise whichever one of those your English heart chooses, or all of them, but I am not… Continue reading